Finally, Good News for the Glen Canyon Owls

This post is reprinted from SFForest.org

The last two years weren’t good to the famous Glen Canyon Great Horned Owls. All the work that was going on, the removal of trees near the nesting tree, the changes to the canyon – they disturbed the owls enough that there were no babies. Even though there’d been other successful nests in San Francisco.

That’s changed this year. The owls are back with a trio of baby owls. Here are some shots taken by wildlife photographer Janet Kessler.

glen canyon owlet 2015 copyright janet kessler

Three baby owls!

Three baby owls!

Mama owl standing guard

Mama owl standing guard

Two baby owls together

Two baby owls together

Mama sitting proudly in back of two of her chicks

Mama sitting proudly in back of two of her chicks

Mama grooms her youngsters after feeding them

Mama grooms her youngsters after feeding them

Meanwhile, here’s another Glen Canyon bird – a Steller’s jay. This picture is also courtesy Janet Kessler.

steller jay glen canyon - copyright Janet Kessler

Bees in Glen Canyon – Lose Some, Win Some

 We’ve reported here before about the bee tree that was cut down as part of the “improvements” to Glen Canyon Park – and the one that was killed by mistake when someone thought it was a nest of yellow-jackets, not bees. This meant that only one of the three wild bee trees was still a living hive. We recently had both good news and bad news. There’s still only one bee tree, but the bees have proved resilient.

Karen Peteros wrote this note, which is published with permission.

 

BEE TREES IN GLEN CANYON by Karen Peteros

Scott Mattoon and I have been working with RPD [San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department] Capital Improvements since 2011 to minimize adverse impacts Glen Canyon Park improvements could have on our feral honey bee colonies.

exposed hive with bees (Photo- Scott Mattoon)

Exposed hive with bees (Photo – Scott Mattoon)

One bee tree was lost on the hill above the Rec Center. Despite many many meetings with RPD, and a negotiated agreement to cut that bee tree at 25′ and otherwise leave it alone, the subcontractor failed to get that instruction and cut the tree at 5′. The trunk split and the colony exposed, but I was able to save the remaining bees and queen and install them in a Langstroth hive.

The bee tree that Scott discovered to have had its hive opening spray-foamed shut a few years back (above where Islais Creek goes underground) due to mistaken identification as a culprit of a nearby sting incident, seems to have reopened and a swarm moved in last year. That colony has done well, and recently swarmed (I understand Philip Gerrie retrieved the swarm).

revived hive

Revived hive – Photo (c) Janet Kessler

the bee tree that was killed has bees again

The bee tree that was killed has bees again. Photo (c) Janet Kessler

After many discussions, emails and meetings with RPD, Scott and I have convinced RPD to leave that tree alone for now. It has a substantial lean but, if it were to fall, it would not cross the path especially if RPD would cut off the top limbs right above the crotch where the limbs grow out of the main trunk. That’s been our recommendation but it has not yet been done to reduce the risks if it were to fall.

As usual RPD does what it wants — under-doing things by not cutting the limbs to reduce the risks if the tree were to fall which has been their stated concern but also over-doing things by placing the orange fence around the tree unreasonably suggesting the bees are a safety hazard when they are not. Nonetheless, the orange fence has served to be educational to bring park goers’ attention to honey bees in a natural habitat.

Finally, the very large mother bee tree, fenced down near Silvertree, with the opening in the base is undisturbed but the colony died out after many years of perpetuating itself.

I have not seen any bee activity there since late last year. 

the remaining bee tree

The old bee tree. Photo (c) Janet Kessler

Give the wax moths another year or more and, hopefully, the cavity will be cleaned out sufficiently to be deemed suitable by a future swarm looking to set up residence.

Karen Peteros,
Glen Park neighborhood resident & beekeeper
San Francisco Bee-Cause

Return of a Rehabilitated Owl

It’s so wonderful to be able to post good news about Glen Canyon and its wildlife. Wildlife photographer Janet Kessler recently sent around this item about a one-eyed owl that has been released in the Canyon after rehabilitation.

Rehabilitated One-Eyed Owl Returned to the Canyon!

The injured owl found in a Glen Canyon neighbor’s yard in September has been rehabilitated and returned! We now have a one-eyed Great Horned Owl living in the area!

owl eye treatment

The Peninsula Human Society (PHS), which rehabilitated the owl, found blood pooling in both of the owl’s eyes — something often seen with head trauma, and there was ulceration of one eye. However, unusually for trauma, there were no broken bones and the beak was not injured, so the cause of the injury still remains a mystery. The PHS treated the owl for a month with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory pain medication, and kept the owl long enough for the blood to drain out of the eyes.

When all was said and done, one eye had recovered, but the other will remain permanently blind. A friend suggested we name the owl “One Eyed Jack”!

Great Horned Owls have large eyes proportional to their bodies, so removing the blind eye was not an option since this could have affected the owl’s balance during flight.

Even with one eye, this owl will be able to perceive depth and hunt accurately. The asymmetrical ear positions on the sides of their heads help owls perceive the location of their prey.

Please call Animal Care & Control, WildCare (a rescue organization), or Peninsula Humane Society if you find an injured wild animal. There is a possibility the animal can be saved, and it definitely can be kept from further pain.

Thanks!  Janet Kessler

2013-09-30 at 10-50-12 one-eyed great horned owl

Sad Death of a Glen Park Barn Owl

dead barn owl

A year ago, one of Glen Canyon’s Great Horned Owls was found dead – poisoned by eating rats that had eaten rat poison.

Now another  dead owl has been found. It’s a barn owl this time. Neighbors want to find out if the cause of death was rodenticide poisons again. They have taken the owl to WildCare – a not-for-profit wildlife rescue organization – for coordination of a necropsy (i.e, an animal autopsy) and toxicology report. They do not have funding to test animals brought in dead by the public and the fees must be paid for by the interested parties. The cost is anticipated to be around $300. Your assistance to help defray the cost would be appreciated.

Edited to Add: The money was raised, the necropsy was performed. Our suspicions proved true. It was rat poison. Read here for details: Rat poison killed the Glen Park owl.

If you’re willing to contribute,  please reference “Barn Owl Patient #1754.”

  • Via phone, please contact WildCare’s Stewardship Manager, Jan Armstrong, 415-453-1000, ext. 13,
  • Online, wildcarebayarea.org, where there’s a link to donate by credit card
  • Send a check directly to WildCare, 76 Albert Park Lane, San Rafael, CA 94901.

There’s an important effort going on to limit the use of the most dangerous rat poisons. You may read about WildCare’s Rodenticide Diagnostics & Advocacy Program on their website. If you have additional questions about rodenticides, you may contact Wildlife Solutions Manager, Kelle Kacmarcik who is coordinating this effort at 415-456-7283, ext. 23.

Canyon Disappointments – by Tony Holiday

Tony Holiday is a trekker and blogger based in San Francisco. He recently re-visited Glen Canyon, and was disappointed with the destruction he saw there. This post is re-published (with minor edits) from his blog, Stairways are Heaven . Visit his blog for more pictures, and more trails reports from all over San Francisco. (An earlier trek through Glen Canyon – before most of the destruction along the trail – is described HERE.)

Thirty-six steps descend into Glen Canyon Park from Elk, the route recently taken for a south-to-north hike. The lower south part of the park is bare and depressing to look at with all that ongoing construction. Workers were also doing something up at the side of the guardrail where Diamond Heights Blvd. starts near Berkeley Way.

Disappointed to see that one of the big old trees on the main trail is now a stump. This is near a short set of wood steps leading up to one of the eastside trails. There are stumps and huge logs laying around.

Main trail, southeast side – stump

When one has grown used to the certain look of a uniquely wild park over many years, it’s difficult to get used to when people who should know better go to such extremes with their version of “park improvements.” Tree limbs have been chopped off all the way along the lower trail as one moves south to north.

“My” beloved northeast trail has seen some clearing too since I last visited. Now it’s easier (a bit too easy!) to navigate the lower trails. I liked it when it was overgrown and “hidden” and I had to crawl under tangles and branches to get to it. I’m now, however, able to look down at Islais Creek from this side of the trail.

Northeast trail – now see-through

Changed my mind a while back about thinking it’d be cool if this trail could be cleared out to Portola (and thus up to Twin Peaks Blvd. and into that park as a continuation) because those in charge don’t seem to know when to quit.

Was naively hoping for minimal clearing, no tree-felling, and a pedestrian skyway over busy Portola (yeah, right), as in just enough space for hikers to navigate without being chewed up alive by brambles, but hopefully leaving the across-the-trail tree limbs alone.

Instead of concentrating on eliminating trees alongside the trail, why not construct more skyways across curvy, dangerous-to-cross streets like O’Shaughnessy, Clarendon, and Portola, to name a few, so one can move easily and safely from one greenspace to another. They’re spending taxpayers’ money on the wrong things.

Thought they did a good job with the new Twin Peaks trail up from Portola, but so far am not impressed with the so-called “improvements” in the lower Canyon. Alongside the extended stairway on the south side of the popular climbing rocks (ascends from the lower trail near the fence and boardwalk), there’s still that ugleee black fencing. Take it down already!

Greenery – and ugly black fencing

The picture below is the newer stairway on the north side of these rocks; love this one.

New staircase

At least now there are still some tree limbs to climb over on the extreme northside trail, but who knows how long this’ll last. Wish they’d stop trying to eliminate the remaining bits of wildness in our urban parks. Canyons are supposed to be “wild.”

After viewing the mess they’ve made so far, I now hope this north end stays tangled and up-and-back after all, and I’m sure the resident wildlife will back me up on this. And not every trail on earth needs to be bike-friendly. The trail still, fortunately, doesn’t go much past the school playing field gate.

School playing field gate

Noticed a pile of old clothes and an old chair in the area this time. A campsite back there too?

Chair in Glen Canyon

Both northernmost trailheads are easier to see now (pic 10) from the trail above.

Trailhead

Out of the park climbing to the shopping center, first up 13 steps to Turquoise Way (no street sign seen when you get to this first Diamond Heights street).

Out of the canyon into the Diamond Heights ‘hood

The stairway continues directly across the street to Amber: 65 steps total to this second street up from the Canyon, pic 12.

Amber

At Amber it’s a short walk (right turn), maybe a couple of blocks, to the next stairway up, Coralino (132 steps), that ascends to Cameo. Coralino is unnamed on the street but named and shown on Google Maps (maps).

Coralino to Cameo, 132 steps

Up Cameo to Duncan and the Little Red Hen community garden (last pic) at the Police Academy. The next street is Diamond Heights Blvd. (right turn) for the Diamond Heights Shopping Center and Christopher Park.

The Little Red Hen Community Garden, Diamond Heights, San Francisco

The Little Red Hen Community Garden, Diamond Heights

Glen Canyon Park: What It Looks Like 6 Months After the Trees

It’s been over six months since the trees were felled between Elk Rd and the Glen Canyon Rec Center.  Here’s what it looks like now.

———————————

The destruction part took no time at all: An avenue of majestic century-old trees, a hillside habitat for birds and animals – including insect-eating bats –  a wild bee-colony,  Those were all gone in days.

The construction part is harder.

A Bushtit’s Nesting Plans in Glen Canyon Park

We are delighted to post this series of pictures by prize-winning wildlife photographer Janet Kessler. They were taken a few days ago in Glen Canyon, where nesting season is in full swing. (We wish SF RPD would take cognizance of this – pesticide applications and removal of thickets and habitat continues.)

I found the tiny little Bushtit — 3.5 inches from tip of the beak to tip of the tail — searching for, finding, and testing building materials for its nest,” she writes. “The materials did not pass muster and were abandoned. Birds have very high standards.” [These pictures have also been posted on the San Francisco Forest Alliance website, HERE.]

0324 bushtit 1

Stringy lichen? Anyway, nesting stuff – maybe

0324 (6) bushtit 2

Gotta run a quality check

0324 (3) bushit 3

Pulling the ball apart

0324 (4) bushtit 4

Hmmm. Maybe it’ll do.

0324 (2) bushtit 5

Get some more

0324 (5) bushtit 6

Still testing -dubious

0324 (7) bushtit 7

Abandoned stuff

0324 (1) bushtit 7

Nah. I don’t think so.